Record Details

Catalog Search



The bell jar : a novel / Sylvia Plath ; foreword by Frances McCullough ; biographical note by Lois Ames ; drawings by Sylvia Plath.

Plath, Sylvia. (Author). McCullough, Fran, 1939- (Added Author). Ames, Lois. (Added Author).

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at Homer Library.

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

View other formats and editions

Location Call Number Barcode Shelving Location Holdable? Status Due Date
Homer Public Library F PLATH 000158782 Fiction Place on copy / volume Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780061148514
  • ISBN: 0061148512
  • ISBN: 9780060174903
  • ISBN: 0060174900
  • Physical Description: xvii, 244 pages, 22 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
  • Edition: 50th anniversary ed.
  • Publisher: New York : HarperPerennial, 2013, ©1996.

Content descriptions

General Note:
25th anniversary edition published 1996, reissued as the 50th anniversary edition in 2013.
Summary, etc.:
Chronicles one young woman's emotional breakdown as she journeys from the glamorous world of Manhattan publishing to the isolation of the asylum.
The Bell Jar is a classic of American literature, with over two million copies sold in this country. This extraordinary work chronicles the crackup of Esther Greenwood: brilliant, beautiful, enormously talented, successful -- but slowly going under, and maybe for the last time. Step by careful step, Sylvia Plath takes us with Esther through a painful month in New York as a contest-winning junior editor on a magazine, her increasingly strained relationships with her mother, and with the boy she dated in college, and eventually, devastatingly, into the madness itself. The reader is drawn into her breakdown with such intensity that her insanity becomes completely real and even rational, as probable and accessible an experience as going to the movies. Such deep penetration into the dark and harrowing corners of the psyche is rare in any novel. It points to the fact that The Bell Jar is a largely autobiographical work about Plath's own summer of 1953, when she was a guest editor at Mademoiselle and went through a breakdown. It reveals so much about the sources of Sylvia Plath's own tragedy that its publication was considered a landmark in literature. -- Publisher description.
Study Program Information Note:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 7.2 11 8651.
Subject: Depression, Mental > Fiction.
Women college students > Suicidal behavior > Fiction.
Suicidal behavior > Fiction.
Depression, Mental.
Suicidal behavior.
Women college students > Suicidal behavior.
Genre: Psychological fiction.
Fiction.
Psychological fiction.