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Proud raven, panting wolf : carving Alaska's New Deal totem parks / Emily L. Moore.

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at Homer Library.

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number Barcode Shelving Location Holdable? Status Due Date
Homer Public Library AK 731.7709798 MOO 000162851 Alaskana -- Nonfiction Place on copy / volume Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780295747552
  • ISBN: 0295747552
  • ISBN: 9780295743936
  • ISBN: 029574393X
  • ISBN: 0295744448
  • ISBN: 9780295744445
  • Physical Description: xv, 252 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), portraits (some color), maps ; 26 cm.
  • Publisher: Seattle : University of Washington Press, [2018]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
Preface: deep carving -- "For future generations" -- Archival claims -- Extracting copies -- French and English totems -- John Wallace's Howkan Eagle -- Proud Raven -- The wolf and the raven -- Model poles and model men -- The Wrangell potlach -- Epilogue: the legacy of the CCC -- Appendix: the people of the New Deal totem parks.
Lead carvers as noted in the appendix followed by the name of camp in parenthesis: John Wallace (Hydaburg) -- James Peele (Kasaan) -- Walter Ketah (Klawock) -- Charles Brown (Saxman) -- George Benson Sr., Harold Bailey, and Peter Nielsen (Sitka) -- Charles Bowen (Totem Bight Clan House) -- Thomas Ukas and Joe Thomas (Wrangell).
Summary, etc.:
"Among Southeast Alaska's best-known tourist attractions are its totem parks, showcases for monumental wood sculptures by Tlingit and Haida artists. Although the art form is centuries old, the parks date back only to the waning years of the Great Depression, when the US government reversed its policy of suppressing Native practices and began to pay Tlingit and Haida communities to restore older totem poles and move them from ancestral villages into parks designed for tourists. Among Southeast Alaska's best-known tourist attractions are its totem parks, showcases for monumental wood sculptures by Tlingit and Haida artists. Although the art form is centuries old, the parks date back only to the waning years of the Great Depression, when the US government reversed its policy of suppressing Native practices and began to pay Tlingit and Haida communities to restore older totem poles and move them from ancestral villages into parks designed for tourists."--Book jacket.
Subject: Totem poles > Alaska > History > 20th century.
Parks > Alaska > History > 20th century.
New Deal art > Alaska.
Tlingit sculpture > Alaska.
Haida sculpture > Alaska.
Indians of North America > Material culture > Alaska.
Haida sculpture.
Indians of North America > Material culture.
New Deal art.
Parks.
Tlingit sculpture.
Totem poles.
Alaska.
Genre: History.