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The free fall of Webster Cummings / by Tom Bodett.

Bodett, Tom, 1955- (Author).

Available copies

  • 2 of 2 copies available at Homer Library.

Current holds

0 current holds with 2 total copies.

Location Call Number Barcode Shelving Location Holdable? Status Due Date
Homer Public Library AK BODETT 000096932 Alaskana -- Fiction Place on copy / volume Available -
Homer Public Library F [AKA DUP] BOD 000092664 Ask Staff -- Duplicate Place on copy / volume Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 0786862092
  • Physical Description: 366 p.
  • Publisher: New York : Hyperion, 1996.
Subject: Travelers > United States > Fiction.
Alaska > Fiction.
Genre: Humorous stories.

Syndetic Solutions - BookList Review for ISBN Number 0786862092
The Free Fall of Webster Cummings
The Free Fall of Webster Cummings
by Bodett, Tom
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BookList Review

The Free Fall of Webster Cummings

Booklist


From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.

Bodett mixes some of the characters from his broadcast and print stories set in little End of the Road, Alaska, with a bunch of folks from the lower 48 (states, that is) in a mannishly sentimental comic novel that's a wee bit weird and ever so heartwarming. Structurally, it's a quilt of stories about at-first-blush unrelated people who, as the pieces get stitched together, turn out to be family. They include, from the stories of The Big Garage at Clearshot (1990), one-armed Ed Flannigan and teenager Norman Tuttle; a homeless guy in Seattle; a New Age channeler-cum-priestess in Oregon; a senior book editor and an advertising exec who are married but living in New York and Los Angeles, respectively; a retired couple who trade their Ohio home for an RV and the lure of the highway; that couple's son and daughter, who separately headed West before them; and Webster Cummings, statistician extraordinaire, who was sucked, midflight, out an airliner's window yet landed on his feet without a scratch--a providence that makes him, an adoptee, decide to find his birth parents. There's also a guardian angel out in the orchard of the Oregon place Ed moves to when his wife gets a teaching job. This is the kind of old-fashioned popular fiction Frank Capra made into movies. Yep, it's that entertaining. (Reviewed March 1, 1996)0786862092Ray Olson

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 0786862092
The Free Fall of Webster Cummings
The Free Fall of Webster Cummings
by Bodett, Tom
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Publishers Weekly Review

The Free Fall of Webster Cummings

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Bodett makes like Garrison Keillor here, writing a novel that reflects the homespun values of a popular NPR series (in Bodett's case, The End of the Road) and several collections spun off from it (The Big Garage on Clear Shot, 1992, etc.). In the New Age mecca of Quartz Creek, Ore., old traditions find new appreciation as Bodett mixes homage and parody, celebrating all the colorfully absurd permutations of the American family. When Ed Flannigan, having lost his arm and his employability, reluctantly moves his family down from Alaska, he has no idea he will soon join a 12-step program for substance abusers, become a peach farmer and open his new home to some improbable family reunions. In Seattle, meanwhile, homeless amnesiac Oliver searches for his past‘and perhaps his future‘in his avid nightly dreams. From Avalon, Ohio, retirees Lloyd and Evelyn Decker head west in a flashy new RV to visit their inhospitable children and see some of the world. And Bostonian Webster Cummings, after surviving a freak accident that sucks him out of an airliner in mid-flight, sets out to find his biological parents. Bodett develops these stories as separate puzzle pieces to be assembled only at the end of the novel. His narration can be sketchy and superficial, with some characters never rising above type, and ambivalent in its stance toward central issues of family dysfunction, pop psychology and mysticism. He knows how to spin a yarn, however, and raise a chuckle, and will leave readers in good humor, with some insights gained. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved