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Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at Homer Library.

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0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number Barcode Shelving Location Holdable? Status Due Date
Homer Public Library F PENNY GAMACHE V.9 000104106 Fiction Place on copy / volume Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780312655471 (hardcover)
  • ISBN: 0312655479 (hardcover)
  • ISBN: 9781466834705 (e-book)
  • ISBN: 1466834706 (e-book)
  • Physical Description: vii, 405 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Edition: First Edition.
  • Publisher: New York : Minotaur Books, 2013.

Content descriptions

Summary, etc.:
In Three Pines Chief Inspector Armand Gamache investigates the disappearance of a woman who was once one of the most famous people in the world and now goes unrecognized by virtually everyone except the mad, brilliant poet Ruth Zardo.
Subject: Gamache, Armand (Fictitious character) > Fiction.
Police > Qu├ębec (Province) > Fiction.
Missing persons > Fiction.
Genre: Mystery fiction.

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 9780312655471
How the Light Gets In
How the Light Gets In
by Penny, Louise
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Publishers Weekly Review

How the Light Gets In

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

The avuncular voice of narrator Ralph Cosham-British, seasoned with more than a hint of Quebecois-fully expresses the mood of wistful regret that permeates this ninth (and perhaps last) chronicle of Penny's Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of the Surete du Quebec. This time, while being pushed to the brink of retirement, the shrewd sleuth also has to juggle a host of problems. His formerly faithful second-in-command and potential son-in-law, Jean-Guy Beauvoir, is suffering from drug problems. Nearly all of Gamache's ultra-efficient homicide team have been re-assigned by the villainous chief superintendent of police, who is about to unleash a long-planned attack against the Canadian government. Gamache's quiet missing-persons case suddenly becomes a front-page story when the victim is revealed as the last of Canada's famous Ouellet quintuplets. And then there's a drowning death at the Champlain Bridge, which Gamache believes is neither an accident nor suicide. Cosham provides Gamache with a variety of spot-on vocal moods. There's a flat, weary approach when he's speaking with the uninspired and disrespectful new members of his team. But once on the job-issuing orders or interrogating suspects and witnesses-Cosham shifts to a hard-edged and no-nonsense delivery. Finally, he sounds thoughtful and relaxed when conversing with his family and the friends he's made in the village of Three Pines, where much of the novel takes place. Cosham manages to distinguish the book's many characters using only subtle shifts in tone, the one exception being the voice he lends shrill, foul-mouthed poetess Ruth Zardo, whose squawk sounds a bit like something her pet duck might utter. This engrossing, well-produced audio ends with a brief conversation between author and reader. A Minotaur hardcover. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Syndetic Solutions - BookList Review for ISBN Number 9780312655471
How the Light Gets In
How the Light Gets In
by Penny, Louise
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BookList Review

How the Light Gets In

Booklist


From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.

*Starred Review* When we last saw Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of the Surete du Quebec, he was solving the murder of a cloistered monk (The Beautiful Mystery, 2012). No problem there, but in the process, his relationship with his deputy, Jean-Guy Beauvoir, imploded, leaving Jean-Guy back on prescription drugs and in league with Gamache's enemies within the police force. That situation has only worsened, as Gamache's attempts to expose corruption and evil-doing at the highest levels of the force have prompted a vicious counterattack, leaving the chief inspector vulnerable professionally and personally. Into that cauldron comes a new murder case involving the death of the last surviving sister of quintuplets, whose birth and early life prompted a Canadian media frenzy in the mid-twentieth century. The dead woman has ties to a resident of Three Pines, the idyllic, off-the-grid village outside Montreal where several of Gamache's previous adventures have been set. Penny does something very clever here, something that heightens the tension and the emotional intensity of the novel: she not only puts Gamache in harm's way but also exposes Three Pines itself to defilement, forcing the reader to face the realization that a place too good for its time may cease to exist as we know it a cozy setting under attack from a decidedly hard-boiled world. Penny has always used setting to support theme brilliantly, but here she outdoes herself, contrasting light and dark, innocence and experience, goodness and evil both in the emotional lives of her characters and in the way those characters leave their footprints on the landscape. Another bravura performance from an author who has reinvented the village mystery as profoundly as Dashiell Hammett transformed the detective novel. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Penny's last novel received a 100,000-copy first printing. This one triples that, only one indication that, in Penny's case, literary quality and commercial success are feeding one another.--Ott, Bill Copyright 2010 Booklist